A Piece of Britain - award winning heritage by Hazle Ceramics
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Essex Embroidery

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Introduction
Issued in 2011 for the Barleylands Collection, the Craft Village where Hazle Ceramics is located. Only a few had criss-cross markings on the quoins - aka masonry corner blocks.

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Hazle Ceramics
Essex Embroidery
Limited Painting of 20
on Windsor Crooked House

Barleylands Collection No 9

£74.50 Worldwide
With Free Postage

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 Images or mottos are embroidered onto new garments or fabric items, supplied for many purposes. Customers’ items are personalised too.

 The shop’s embroidery machine.

Embroidery Techniques
Remarkably the basic stitches of early work such as chain, satin, blanket, running and cross stitch are still used today. Surviving examples from the ancient world often show a technical skill rarely attained in later times. Machine embroidery from the Industrial Revolution onwards looks like hand work, especially chain stitch. However machine work relying on multiple threads resembles hand embroidery in appearance only not construction.

 Machine chain stitch from China in early 2000s.

 Detail from the Bayeux Tapestry of the 11th Century. Laid threads, a surface technique of wool on linen, actually make this an embroidery!

 “I’ve just done 9 months inside” bib in a Baby Set.

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